Good news for home equity borrowers from the IRS

Tax reform has led to confusion over some of the changes to longstanding deductions, including the deduction for interest on home equity loans.

The IRS has since clarified that the interest on home equity loans, home equity lines of credit and second mortgages will, in many cases, remain deductible under the new laws, regardless of how the loan is labeled.

Previous provisions

Under prior tax law, taxpayers could deduct “qualified residence interest” on a loan of up to $1 million secured by a qualified residence, plus interest on a home equity loan (other than debt used to acquire a home) up to $100,000. The home equity debt could not exceed the fair market value (FMV) of the home reduced by the debt used to acquire the home.

For tax purposes, a qualified residence is the taxpayer’s principal residence and a second residence, (e.g. house, condominium, cooperative, mobile home, house trailer or boat). The principal residence is where the taxpayer resides most of the time; the second residence is any other residence the taxpayer owns and treats as a second home. Taxpayers are not required to use the second home during the year to claim the deduction. If the second home is rented to others, though, the taxpayer also must use it as a home during the year for the greater of 14 days or 10% of the number of days it is rented.

In the past, interest on qualifying home equity debt was deductible regardless of how the loan proceeds were used. A taxpayer could, for example, use the proceeds to pay for medical bills, tuition, vacations, vehicles and other personal expenses and still claim the itemized interest deduction.

The new tax rules

The new rule under tax reform limits the amount of the mortgage interest deduction for taxpayers who itemize through 2025. Beginning in 2018, a taxpayer can deduct interest only on mortgage debt of $750,000. The congressional conference report on the law stated that it also suspends the deduction for interest on home equity debt. And the actual bill includes the section caption “DISALLOWANCE OF HOME EQUITY INDEBTEDNESS INTEREST.” As a result, many people believed tax reform eliminates the home equity loan interest deduction.

On February 21, the IRS issued a release explaining that the law suspends the deduction only for interest on home equity loans and lines of credit that are not used to buy, build or substantially improve the taxpayer’s home that secures the loan. In other words, the interest is not deductible if the loan proceeds are used for certain personal expenses, but it is if the proceeds go toward, for example, a new roof on the home that secures the loan. The IRS further stated that the deduction limits apply to the combined amount of mortgage and home equity acquisition loans — home equity debt is no longer capped at $100,000 for purposes of the deduction.

Some examples from the IRS help show how the new rules work:

Stay tuned

The new IRS announcement highlights the fact that the nuances of tax reform  will take some time to flesh out completely. We will keep you updated on the most significant new rules and guidance as they emerge.

Trinity Bradley-Anderson, CPA, CEO/Managing Partner
Trinity has been in public accounting since 1996. Her specialties include real estate and construction clients, small businesses and their owners.